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Jane Austen (Obras Selectas Series) By Jane Austen READ ONLINE If looking for the recent BBC series Lost In O universo feminino nas obras de Jane Austen. salv.pirsidvik.space: Sense & Sensibility - BBC TV mini series (Sensatez & Sentimientos) 3-DVD Boxset[NTSC/Region 1 and 4 dvd. Import - Latin America] (Spanish. La pongo al par de Shakespeare, Cervantes y Henry Fielding.»Henry JamesEn Sentido y sensibilidad, Jane Austen. CHAPPAQUIDDICK SKYLINE TORRENT At this point, the router should reboot and come. It costs less works if I just use the lanip of the. Download and Upload processed by the that computer is.

I really do. And much longer as it is a series, so it just gives me more of my favorite genre. There are some steamy love scene images at the beginning that I have to skip if my children are around, but the rest is really lovely. The film is visually stunning the houses ,the wardrobe, the landscapes etc. The characters all seem to be the right age, so in that regard it is a bit more true to the book that Ms.

Thomson's version. Brett L. Top Contributor: Batman. Just got done watching this and inevitably, comparisons to the Emma Thompson version had to pop up. This version is longer, and I don't feel it adds much more to the story, with the exception of a few minor characters. None of this takes away fro mthe fact this this is a fine version just different, but not different in a way that detracts from the stories.

The characters: Elinor, Mary Anne, Colonel Brandon, etc are all the same, they are just acted differently. For the most part the characters are all played with much less hyperbole. It is a less glamorous production: the colors are often muted, though using the jump cuts to create tension gets kind of boring. The story centers more around Mary Anne and Colonel Brandon.

You see that Mary Anne does truly love him for who is he is, whereas in the Emma Thompson movie he seems to become more of his care taker. And the actor who played Colonel Brandon, I have only seen him on other roles notably Our Mutual Friend and the Walking Dead where he starts off as on on the edge psycho and then becomes a full tilt pyscho, so nice to seem him in a good guy role, all though I was waiting for him to pop his cork at any minute, ha ha. The actor really brings out the characters "still waters run deep" aspect of his true love.

All in all a great addition to the library and definitely worth it. To me, this is the best screen version of Sense and Sensibility. The actor's are closer to the character's ages, and the men are more likable and more manly. Hattie Morahan gives a finely nuanced performance; in fact, all the performances are better than in Emma Thompson's film.

Which btw, is a good movie in itself. This version is a television mini-series, so it is in five episodes. This is the second version of this DVD that I have ordered. It is superb! The actors, the story line, the scenery is much preferred over the one staring Emma Thompson, Aan Rickman and Hugh Grant. David Morrissey plays an excellent role as Col Brandon, more so than the morose Alan Rickman, in my opinion.

I highly recommend this DVD, you will not be disappointed. I'm thinking this is my new favorite version Miss Austin Regrets. It is BBC and was free, however, it would not play. I found the film a little meh, but this BBC miniseries captured the characters and the storyline beautifully. Perfect casting, yet another enjoyable and comforting Austen adaptation to watch.

This is a great little 3 part show. Originally I didn't like it so much. I felt the music was ham handed, but as time goes by, I absolutely love it. Give it a shot if you haven't already. See all reviews. Top reviews from other countries. There have been very many film productions of this novel, but this one is a cut above them all, matching even Emma Thompson's Oscar-winning cinema version. Here we have, from the very first scene, a potent, dramatic and fresh take on the novel.

Director John Alexander, seems to have never made it to the big screen, but his vision and ability illuminates every frame of this mini-series. I have read the novel many times, and know it well, but Alexander manages to inject something new and startling into this all-too-familiar tale of the Dashwoods, their fall from wealthy society, and the ensuing plight of the elder two of the three daughters.

The production values are worthy, and the BBC has furnished the series with what appears to be a suitable budget to do it justice. The score is wonderfully evocative of the mood, conjuring drama and romance aplenty throughout. The photography is also tremendous, and seems to takes it influence from Lord Leighton paintings, One moment in episode two is certainly taken straight from Leighton's painting "Invocation".

If the series has a weakness, it is in its similarity to Thompson's version. Barton Cottage has an almost identical floor plan, as does the structure of some of the scenes. That said, the plot stays very close to the novel, and throws in plenty elsewhere that is original but entirely in keeping. The casting is excellent, as is the acting. I am perplexed at why Wakefield, for whom this was her first screen role, never capitalized on this performance to go beyond doing stints in "Casualty" and the like, as she commands every scene in which she appears.

There are some decent extras. We have a commentary by Elinor Dashwood, Edward Ferris, the director and producer, though they sometimes seem at a loss to know what to say. There's also an interview with producer and script writer, in which much needless comparison is made with Thompson's movie version, as if the two were in competition, which they were not.

That said, when the series was first broadcast, the BBC introduced it by mentioning the movie, which was a silly thing to do as the series is every bit as good as the movie in every respect. Overall, this adaptation really is a must-have in any costume drama fan's collection. It is the BBC doing what it does so very well - producing a masterclass of acting and production, fabulous on-location shooting in this case with all the drama of the windswept Devon coastline , and wonderful scripting, which makes the series entertaining and surprisingly original.

It is such a good series, I wonder why on earth the BBC produces such gems, and then steadfastly refuses to give them a repeat showing. Goodness know, plenty of drivel seems to merit endless repeats. The screenwriters working for BBC most often do their job with sense, with care, with intelligence.

After his major achievement in the Pride and Prejudice Mr. Davies appears to have gone soft One person found this helpful. I can't believe I hadn't even known about this version until recently when I spotted it on the TV. I caught it part way through, and I was enjoying it so much I went straight online to purchase a copy. As much as I adore the Emma Thompson film, this BBC mini series is in many ways a more authentic version of the story. The cast are truly exceptional and beautifully matched to their roles, the settings are a lot more grounded and give a far more accurate insight into the degree of change in the lives of the family, and it has a wonderful energy to it.

If you love Jane Austen, this is definitely an interpretation worth adding to your library. An exceptional performance by Hattie Morahan as the guiding "sense" in Jane Austen's tale the best Austen turn I've seen on film with the possible exception of Amanda Root in Persuasion.

The restraint she's brings to her portrayal is utterly true to Georgian values and to the character Austen has written. Her delicacy and her manners, are perfectly pitched. Sense and Sensibility is a story of two young sisters on a voyage of burgeoning sexual and romantic discovery.

The death of Elinor and Marianne's father throws their privileged world into chaos. With no entitlement to his estate, they are forced to live in poverty. Although the sisters' chances of marriage seem doomed, attractive men are drawn to the girls. Elinor becomes attached to the highly eligible Edward Ferrars Dan Stevens - The Line of Beauty - but why is he so guarded and secretive? Do these attachments represent true love, or are the men simply amusing ourselves with our young heroines?

With a sub-plot that features the seduction and abandonment of a year old schoolgirl - not to mention a duel - the stakes are high. Multi-award winning writer Andrew Davies Bleak House and Pride and Prejudice says, "The novel is as much about sex and money as social conventions. This drama is more overtly sexual than most previous Austen adaptations seen on screen and gets to grips with the dark underbelly of the book.

Kate Harwood, Head of Series and Serials adds, "It's a passionate and powerful piece, filled with a rich mix of both emerging and established talent.

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Edward se reconcilia con su madre, que le da 10 libras, suficiente para que ellos vivan confortablemente. Se casan y se mudan a la parroquia de Delaford. Willoughby se da cuenta entonces de que casarse con Marianne hubiera producido el mismo resultado. Ella y el coronel se establecen cerca de Elinor y Edward, de manera que las hermanas y sus maridos pueden visitarse a menudo. La trama gira en torno al contraste entre el buen sentido de Elinor y las emociones de Marianne.

Estos dos personajes pudieron basarse vagamente en Jane y Cassandra Austen, con Elinor representando a Cassandra como la hermana reprimida y juiciosa y ella misma como la emocional. Por estas razones, algunos lectores encuentran que el matrimonio de Marianne con el coronel acabe siendo un final poco satisfactorio.

Elinor es el verdadero hilo conductor de la novela. Es necesaria la virtud. Sentido y sensibilidad ha tenido varias adaptaciones [1] :. De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre. Orgullo y prejuicio. Vistas Leer Editar Ver historial. Wikimedia Commons Wikiquote. Thomas Egerton.

Sensatez y sentimiento. In short: sense and sensibility, same difference. Still, her acerbic satire is the first drop of acid that will eventually erode the oppressive lid of the age-old capitalistic patriarchy. NB: A massive thank you to my brilliant reading buddy, Michelle: check out her review right here.

View all 23 comments. I love these books so much 4. I love these books so much This is the third Jane Austen book I've read and it's by far my favorite. I love the story, love the heroines, love the MEN I just love everything about this. View all 3 comments. For me, it took too long to get going. Not until they arrived in London that I started to get curious about how the story will unfold and what will happen to the Dashwood sisters. Elinor, I liked well enough but I found Marianne to be too self-righteous and annoying.

She did turn a new leaf in the end but I think it came too late for me to start liking her at that point. Owning to the fact that bec [reread] And even after I thought I was in the clear, had to suffer through his long arse, asinine speech of how he pitied himself view spoiler [for having to give Marianne up in order to marry his very wealthy wife Insufferable man! Get lost already!

I'm afraid I was not partial to any of the men in this. Can you tell? The only one with Y chromosome who was a bit interesting was Colonel Brandon but he had such a small role in the book. I wish we could see more of him! Even Mr. Palmer was entertaining to read about. As for the rest, I hated Willoughby yes, needed to be point out again and Edward was All these main characters in this book made me appreciate, probably for the first time, the 'mouthy' characters in Austen novels.

I know, I know, I'm shocked myself. I never endeared myself to any of them before. Although I was real close to do that for Miss Bates in Emma but ended up didn't - she was okay but that was all. Here, I loved it whenever Mrs. Palmer were in the scene. Delightful in contrast of several insipid, stoic characters. View all 28 comments. This is a great story and very interesting, but neither of the heroines is a favorite of mine.

And I'm not really crazy about the boys, either. I'm not saying Austen wrote them incorrectly, but these were different times, and not all the stuff they did translates all that well into most people's version of what a modern-day heroine or hero should look like. If you're a new-to-Austen reader, just keep that in mind. The general gist of this one is that two sisters, who have recently fallen on ha This is a great story and very interesting, but neither of the heroines is a favorite of mine.

The general gist of this one is that two sisters, who have recently fallen on hard financial times, also fall in love with two men. With vastly different ways of showing it, and vastly different outcomes to their respective romances. Marianne is impetuous, full of life, sure of herself, and unwilling to tone it down , as my mother would say. Her ideas of love are pure romance, and anyone who looks at love differently has no soul. She very much represents how love is perceived by someone who is young or doesn't really have any experience with the many different ways real love makes an appearance.

Elinor is very much the woman who knows how to put her lipstick on and hide her crazy, as my mother would also say. In other words, she's got the Sense and Sensibility not to share her hopes and dreams, inner turmoil, or just her business in general with everyone. Because let's face it, Marrianne is ridiculous. Not her spirit, but her ideas of this perfect man and perfect love that will forever stamp your soul are just bonkers.

I think we all men and women start out with a little bit of Marrianne in ourselves. You only know what you know. This means that young people aren't particularly stupid, they just haven't had enough LIFE slap them upside their heads yet. But they will. Ooooooh, they will. At the same time, I don't think Elinor is a paragon of womanhood just because she managed to stuff each and every emotion deeeeeep into some secret hidey-hole in her psyche. I can't help but think it would have been better for her to confide in someone Don't judge.

We all have our ways of coping. Ok, ok. So, even if this wasn't my complete cuppa, it's still a fantastic story and a must for anyone who is Austen-curious. As always, she wrote characters who were for the times true to life, fully formed, and definitely worth reading about. View all 63 comments. After this second read, I'm compelled to amend my first review, for my perspective of the book is quite altered.

This debut publication of Jane Austen is, in my view, a complete book in itself, an excellent introduction of Jane Austen to the world of classical literature. On this second read, the first surprise I was in for is the dramatic quality of the book on the whole. I've certainly missed that.

The actions, the suspense, the wealth of emotions it arouses are beyond comparison. It is powerf After this second read, I'm compelled to amend my first review, for my perspective of the book is quite altered. It is powerful and strong, and also theatrical. The reading experience was very satisfying and rewarding, for it was not mere reading, it was also seeing the story come alive before you.

I didn't read, I lived it. The story is, of course, focused on the lives, loves, desires, longings, and characters of the Dashwood sisters. Elinor is the kind, devoted and reasonable sort with rare strength and fortitude. Marianne, on the other hand, although kind and devoted, is impulsive, emotional, and opinionated.

The popular and accepted character interpretation of Elinor and Marianne is that the former represents sense and the latter sensibility. However, I doubt whether such a strict distinction is possible. It wouldn't be fair to say that Elinor is not sensible nor Marianne has no sense. I believe the distinction lies in the degree. The main focus of the story is on Elinor and Marianne's love stories. Elinor's and Edward's love and attachment to each other were very subtle in their presentation, unlike Marianne's and Willoughby's which was very expressive.

This is why I felt Elinor's and Edward's love was forced, not felt but only stated. I'm glad my misunderstanding was rectified with this reading. Sense and Sensibility however is more than a love story. It addresses many other deeper issues such as vanity, self-realization, class difference, and human nature.

Jane Austen is well known for her social criticism and commentary of the regency period and her brilliancy in human observation. Jane Austen's hero in Sense and Sensibility is an unusual choice compared with her later choices of heroes. Colonel Brandon is not a young man but a man in his prime. This choice was somewhat a puzzle to me earlier, but now I comprehend that it was essential to the story. A man with good sense, kind-hearted, strong, and benevolent, a man who has an unhappy past, a man who himself has suffered so that he could empathize with another had to be chosen to be the hero.

I highly commend Austen for her excellent choice and for giving us a lifelong loving character. The rest of the characters who set the story in motion have the usual Austen flavour. The oppressed and misunderstood Edward, naive mother Dashwood, the silly but kind Mrs. Ferrars are variation enough to keep the readers interested, engaged and absorbed. I love her amazing ability to draw you into the setting of the story and to make you part of it.

Her characters are so real that the good ones become your friends while the wicked ones become your enemies! This element of realism is one of the strongest reasons for the popularity of her work over the years. Sense and Sensibility is undoubtedly a brilliant piece of work by Jane Austen, and the reading experience was highly gratifying.

View all 8 comments. Hmmm, how to critique one of the most revered writers of romance literature? Now, before all of your Jane-ites get on my case for being unromantic or whatever, let me say only that unfortuantely, I read "Persuasion," Austen's last novel, and found it to be one of the best books I've ever read.

Now having read "Sense and Sensibility," I will say that it truly doese feel like a first novel, as if the author was still trying to find her voice. So I've done the bookends of Austen, much like a concer Hmmm, how to critique one of the most revered writers of romance literature?

So I've done the bookends of Austen, much like a concert of Beethoven's 1st and 9th symphonies Her prose is art, but the story, in my opinion, is lacking. Two semi-rich young women do the social dance with men who are alternately gentlemanly or cads, reversals and revelations ensue, followed at the end by weddings which are not exactly meant to leave us with the warmest of feelings as many weddings do. Many of the characters are unlikable some are downright despicable and I felt all along that much like Shakespeare, Austen's stories are meant to be performed rather than read, so that the subtleties of the social ingraces and the sublimations of true feelings can be more truly experienced by an audience.

The plot itself is anything but complicated and I'm sorry to say that without Austen's ingenious prose, this novel would barely merit a footnote in history. My recommendation for those of you who are not hardcore Austen fans, read "Persuasion" instead. View all 24 comments. Tyler Persuasion is definitely a better book in my opinion. Tatiana Silva I couldn't agree more with your review! I've never really finished it before, I couldn't agree more with your review!

I've never really finished it before, but watched one of the movie adaptations. I'm a huge Austen fan, read almost all of her books, my favorite is the classic Pride and Prejudice, but Persuasion is her top writing moment. I would not recommend Persuasion as a first try for someone that is not used to Austen's books, though it's one of her shortest stories, a lot of it happens in what the characters refuse to say and even think, and her narrator is at its sharpest, so getting used to her writing and technique first, with easier books like famous Emma, would be better.

I also would recommend the lovely Northanger Abbey as a first read, it's funny and way more captivating. Though as previous people said, it's not her first novel, but Pride and Prejudice was rewritten, so that's where its attractiveness comes from. By my own reading "measures", I put it there too. August This is my first Jane Austen. I don't even know why. It's about. Who are jerks! Um, the end! But it was funny.

But clever funny, which is my favorite kind. And I enjoyed deciphering the late 18th century prose. It made me feel smart, just to figure out what she was saying half the time! Also I love all the wacky British society stuff. Like sending notes! And walking places! And having breakfast at other peoples' houses! And I enjoyed figuring out the etiquette of the day.

Like, it's improper to exchange letters with a member of the opposite sex with whom you are not engaged? But it's cool to be engaged and not TELL anyone? I love it. Seriously, who would think I would like Jane Austen so much? The narrator was Donada Peters. I've never heard of her before, but she did a great job.

I am now going to listen to every Austen audiobook I can get my hands on, and also a biography. I'm reading Frank Herbert and Jane Austen at once! I have since read every Jane Austen novel, most of them several times over, and think of her as an old friend. I always forget how much of it takes place in London! This is probably my third-favorite Austen, after Persuasion and Emma.

This one is nice because most of the characters are decent people, even if they might be, like, rude or overbearing or boring or something. I mean obviously not the bad guys, the Dashwood son and his wife and her mother. But everybody else is okay. As opposed to, say, Mansfield Park , which I also reread recently, in which everybody suuuuuuuuucks , even the people we are ostensibly supposed to be rooting for or are we?? Elinor is the best, obviously. I have no idea how this Elinor is spelled, as I only have listened to his, but I think I have it right, because it's weird and old-fashioned.

Oh and Willoughby sucks too, forgot about him. And I kept falling asleep at the conversation that he has with E at the end where he apparently partially vindicates himself and his actions so I can't remember why E partially forgives him. She is possibly my favorite Austen protagonist? I'm not sure, I'll have to read Persuasion again. Anyway if you want to talk about Jane Austen, get at me.

View all 11 comments. This book nearly failed the Bechdel test. There were an equal assortment of men and women, only the men seem to have a lemming like migratory bent, and fly from the nest for some reason or other. Elinor is a blueprint for heroines that are strong.

At least we can agree on the fact that most strong heroines in films are indistinguishable from men. But here there cannot be such confusion. I was not immune to the charms of Sense and sensibility. It was very tough for me to read. At least I was now pr This book nearly failed the Bechdel test. At least I was now prepared for the style of this classic. I thought that the men in the book were all expendable. In this way, the 19th century seemed like a futuristic society. Eerie but true.

View all 27 comments. My first Jane Austen, and I liked it. However, afterwards, the story didn't thrill me as much as Jane Eyre, another Victorian tale that I had devoured and deeply moved me. There I moaned and sympathised with the disappointments of the Dashwood sisters in this basket of heartless and unscrupulous vipers, more interested in the size of their dowry than in their undeniable human qualities. But it is pretty long and monotonous in action, the trips between London and the various residences, the inter-f My first Jane Austen, and I liked it.

But it is pretty long and monotonous in action, the trips between London and the various residences, the inter-family gossip, the marital manoeuvres, the sweet lines and the sneaking shots. In short, this atmosphere is weighty, but the style is remarkable since I wanted to know how it would end for Elinor and Marianne at all costs.

And finally, I am a little disappointed with this ending which looks like dramatic bellows fallen. It is nevertheless a beautiful read for the character's psychological depth and what it teaches about the customs of the time and the disregard made for women and their future.

View all 7 comments. Shelves: fiction , brit-lit , 19th-century , regency , owned , mawwiageiswhatbringsustogethertoday , its-the-quiet-ones. Can't quite put it all into words yet. Also deservedly so. This is my intellectual favorite of the Austens. By that, I'm not calling it "intellectual" I'm just saying that taking emotional attachment to other books out of it, this is my objective favorite Austen.

I actually believe that the story of the women is better than Pride and Prejudice. Go on, shoot me for that one. I've taken it before for that. The romance might be better, more tight, more like one would idealistically want in Pride and Prejudice, but the ones here are more realistic and would have a better chance of lasting in real life. Colonel Brandon and Marianne are one of my favorite flawed couples of any piece of literature. This book finds faith in romances that are less than perfect, heroes who don't act like heroes Colonel Brandon wins over the romantic figure of Willoughby in the end , and heroines who are at times geniunely ridiculous in the things they choose to do.

Not because Austen writes them ridiculously. All women do things like that, and these girls find their way to love anyway. And not with the people conventional plotlines or even gothic strangeness would normally put them with either. By all rights, Eleanor and Colonel Brandon should make a quietly sensible couple, if one thinks about it. But that's not how this ends. There's enough romance left in it for some poetry to how the story ends.

None of the men are one or even two dimensional, either. They don't merely serve as the means to the narcissitic heroine's end. No cardboard Prince Charmings with one ridiculous flaw here. They're very believable. I've always thought one of the strengths of Austen is that she writes novels that are undoubtably marketed to women, but men can still see themselves in her heroes if they read them.

The movie is my favorite Jane Austen movie, as a side note. And one of my favorites in general. I've been watching it since I was about It's beautiful. So is the soundtrack. Emma Thompson's performance alone is worth the viewing. Ang Lee.. Yes, he did period pieces. Who would have known, right? View all 80 comments. A bit of an unpopular opinion, I imagine, but this was one of those cases where the film was better than the book. That said, the book was obviously written for a Georgian audience, and the fact that it remains a classic two hundred years later is proof of its brilliance.

Not going to lie, the middle was rough.. View all 5 comments. I hate romantic comedies. I hate them for a wide variety of reasons - I hate their formulaic plots, their repeated character tropes that never seem to change hmm, will this one have a sassy best friend who only exists to dispense advice?

But mostly, I hate them because their plots I hate romantic comedies. But mostly, I hate them because their plots revolve entirely around what boy likes what girl and vice versa, and nothing else ever happens. Sure, there can be subplots, and yes, brilliant romantic comedies do exist, but I want my movie protagonists to do more than worry about who they're going to marry.

Nothing else happens: they go to a ball, where they worry about which boy isn't dancing with them; they have tea, where they talk about which girls have snagged which boys; and they write letters about which girls have done scandalous things with boys.

It's just pages and pages of "I like you but you hate me! Let's get married! I love the humor, and I love the characters, I just want them to do something interesting. This is probably why Pride and Prejudice and Zombies resonated so well with me - finally, the Bennett sisters got to do something besides sit around and mope about the various boys who weren't talking to them for whatever reason!

Sense and Sensibility is one long slog of "I love this boy! But oh no, he's engaged to someone else! The only thing that would make me want to finish the book is if the story ends with Elinor and Marianne deciding to go off to college or travel to China or fight zombies or do something besides get married. But I know they won't, because this is an Austen novel, and things only end one way here. There's nothing fundamentally wrong with romantic comedies - they're funny, lighthearted entertainment where everyone is beautiful and nothing hurts, and the people who get unhappy endings were mean people and deserved it anyway.

I do not begrudge anyone for liking this kind of entertainment - it's just not my taste, and I won't waste any time feeling bad about this. Sorry, Ms. I gave it my all, but it's just not going to work out. But don't worry: it's not you, it's me. View all 39 comments. Jun 11, h. Foster has written, the devout "Janeite" "like all regular churchgoers Nor do we need such a great deal of ingenuity to see that all, or nearly all, the great issues in human life make their appearance on Jane Austen's narrow stage.

True, it is only a stage of petty domestic circumstance; but that, after all, is the only stage where most of us are likely to meet them. Jane Austen's stage, then, is narrow; it is also devoted to entertainment; and we may fail to recognize the great issues of life in their humorous garb unless we are prepared to view the comic mode as an entertainment which can be both intellectually and morally serious. Today we are less accustomed to look for universal norms in what we read Jane Austen's own standards were, like those of her age, much more absolute; and as a novelist she presented all her characters in terms of of their relations to a fixed code of values.

Watt Note to self and readers in general: When you are reading Jane Austen, try to consider "the universal norms" of her and her times and not only your individual experience! No wonder, I was totally shocked at the unromantic ending. A few years later -when my then-BF did a kinda Willoughby on me- I appreciated the ending a bit more, but it still left me unconvinced about the book's obvious merits. And then came the film of with Alan Rickman, The Divine, which just so totally distorted my "objective" views of Colonel Brandon's character that I have not recovered ever since!

Maybe, just maybe, I am old enough now to venture a review. Even when we consider Sense and Sensibility through the lense of romance unadvised, but there you go , it is definitely the least romantic JA book, even though having Marianne Dashwood, the most romantic and truly tragic JA heroine as one of its centre.

Until the heroines don't go through their "baptism of fire" that is self-knowledge, they don't gain the right of passage to a happy ending This is the same for Elizabeth, Emma, Catherine and even for Anne, though maybe not for Fanny and Elinor. Admittedly, the "happy ending" is rather questionable here with our 21st century-sensibilities, but let's call it that anyway. And please don't forget Alan Rickman! Call me Elinor.

Being the older sibling, while growing up I often felt like I was shoved into the role of being the sensible one, the reasonable one, the responsible one. That is how I was seen. That is what people believed of me. Underneath the skin of the rational, reserved tut-tutter writhed an often non-sensical, unreasonable, irresponsible being. But it took the occurrence of extreme circumstances for others to see it. Such is the life of Elinor Dashwood, the elder sister in a small, displac Call me Elinor.

Such is the life of Elinor Dashwood, the elder sister in a small, displaced family of all females. It is her younger, flightier sister Marianne who seems to grab life by the balls. By all outward appearances, Marianne is the feeling one. Revealing the depths of the true feelings these two sisters experience, whether on their sleeves or behind seemingly impenetrable layers of veils, is the goal Jane Austen set herself in Sense and Sensibility , and she achieved it spectacularly.

With alternately bold and subtle strokes, the author created a masterwork of intricate design. One criticism might be that the design is too delicate in places a cracked block or two out of the many solid ones upon which the premiss is built or too much of a reliance on happenstance , but it is not enough to deter from the overall achievement: Austen's triumphant capture of human behavior and that odd incarnation of emotion in early 19th century Britain.

View all 19 comments. Am I even befitting to write a review on such a literary excellence? Do I even attempt to? No instead I shall divulge on the greatness of The literature master-woman Jane Austen. It is still a wonder on how she managed to produce such stories that even centuries later would be loved? That at such an age she managed to write such female characters that they would be of a constant pillar for women even now?

It is of much wonder. There is no testimony anywhere that can deter her being one of the gre Am I even befitting to write a review on such a literary excellence? There is no testimony anywhere that can deter her being one of the greatest authors of her time and even now.

Indeed our love for Jane at least my love for her would be never ending. As years pass by, I understand the beauty of such novels, in a simple strike, such novels have in a way paved the path for women all over. Not in the character but the author herself. Showing the world that we females too can overcome barriers to stand on our own two feet.

With that note I shall part way with you reader. I need not remind you twice to make sure to read this. Readers also enjoyed. About Jane Austen. Jane Austen. Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics.

Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentr Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature, her realism and biting social commentary cementing her historical importance among scholars and critics. Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry.

She was educated primarily by her father and older brothers as well as through her own reading. The steadfast support of her family was critical to her development as a professional writer. Her artistic apprenticeship lasted from her teenage years until she was about 35 years old. During this period, she experimented with various literary forms, including the epistolary novel which she tried then abandoned, and wrote and extensively revised three major novels and began a fourth.

From until , with the release of Sense and Sensibility , Pride and Prejudice , Mansfield Park and Emma , she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion , both published posthumously in , and began a third, which was eventually titled Sanditon , but died before completing it. Austen's works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century realism.

Her plots, though fundamentally comic, highlight the dependence of women on marriage to secure social standing and economic security. Her work brought her little personal fame and only a few positive reviews during her lifetime, but the publication in of her nephew's A Memoir of Jane Austen introduced her to a wider public, and by the s she had become widely accepted in academia as a great English writer.

The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of Austen scholarship and the emergence of a Janeite fan culture.

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Sensatez y sentimientos serie bbc subtitulada torrent The restraint she's brings to her portrayal is utterly true to Georgian values and to the character Austen has written. It is superb! I know that the more classical one is the one with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet, and I also love it. The characters: Elinor, Mary Anne, Colonel Brandon, etc are all the same, they are just acted differently. Elinor becomes attached to the highly eligible Edward Ferrars Dan Stevens - The Line of Beauty - but why is he source guarded and secretive?
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Aunque no es guapo ni encantador, Elinor pronto admira la inteligencia de Edward y su buen sentido. Sin embargo, la fortuna de Edward depende del deseo de su madre. Su casero es Sir John Middleton, un primo lejano que generosamente les ofrece una renta baja. Margaret no puede detener su vertiginoso descenso y bajo la intensa lluvia, llega primera al hogar. Edward Ferrars viene a visitar a las Dashwood a Barton Cottage, pero parece infeliz y se mantiene distante respecto a Elinor.

Sin embargo, a diferencia de Marianne, ella no se permite regodearse en su tristeza. Marianne escribe a Willoughby, pero sus cartas quedan sin respuesta. Edward se niega a acabar con el compromiso y su madre lo deshereda. El coronel Brandon, sabiendo que la vida puede quedar arruinada si se niega el verdadero amor, ofrece su parroquia de Delaford a Edward, aunque lo conoce muy poco. Marianne se recupera y las Dashwood regresan a Barton Cottage.

Elinor le cuenta a Marianne la visita de Willoughby. Edward se reconcilia con su madre, que le da 10 libras, suficiente para que ellos vivan confortablemente. Se casan y se mudan a la parroquia de Delaford. Willoughby se da cuenta entonces de que casarse con Marianne hubiera producido el mismo resultado. Ella y el coronel se establecen cerca de Elinor y Edward, de manera que las hermanas y sus maridos pueden visitarse a menudo. La trama gira en torno al contraste entre el buen sentido de Elinor y las emociones de Marianne.

The romances in here were more fickle and self-involved compared to her other novels. It also made the reading experience far more entertaining. In Pride and Prejudice , Emma and even Persuasion it was so very clear how it would all end. This one, on the other hand, made things a little more lively. And, of course, I could only ever give it five stars because of its subtle wit, eloquence of expression and sophisticated plot.

How I do love Austen. I've just got Mansfield Park left to read now. Facebook Twitter Insta Academia View all 22 comments. I'm not a fan of Jane Austen. I've given her many chances, and do really want to like her work, but am always let down -- until now, that is! I enjoyed Sense and Sensibility so much more than I was expecting to! I still wouldn't rank it on the same level as the Bronte sisters, but the story is sardonically funny, clever and surprisingly gripping for one with such a slow pace!

I thought the characters were really believable. Those characters who seemed more 2D at the beginning, grew out of later- I'm not a fan of Jane Austen. Those characters who seemed more 2D at the beginning, grew out of later-revealed back-stories which made them more complex and complicated any notion of good and evil in the book. I particularly loved Marianne as a character, and how she transgresses what is expected of proper, upper-class ladies. Instead of talking in the drawing room, she will take up a book or stare out of the window or go on a long walk outside.

She is strong and fiery and a new favourite of mine. I would definitely recommend this to you -- even if you didn't like Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion and Mansfield Park all of which I will now be giving another go! View all 21 comments. Me and my character curiosity blown out of normalcy! Doesn't anyone else feel this way? One of the most satisfactory endings of all times! I needed more of Edward and Eleanor. And more interaction between Brandon and Marianne. It's so beautiful. View all 9 comments.

Henry Dashwood, his second wife, and their three daughters live for many years with Henry's wealthy bachelor uncle. That uncle decides, in late life, to will the use and income only of his property first to Henry, then to Henry's first son John Dashwood by his first marriage , so that the property should pass intact to John's three-year-old son Harry.

The uncle dies, but Henry lives just a year after that and he is unable in such short time to save enough money for his wife Mrs Dashwood, and their daughters, Elinor, Marianne and Margaret, who are left only a small income. On his deathbed, Mr Henry Dashwood extracts a promise from his son John to take care of his half-sisters.

But before Henry is long in the grave, John's greedy wife, Fanny, persuades her husband to renege on the promise, appealing to his concerns about diminishing his own son Harry's inheritance despite the fact that John is independently wealthy thanks to his inheritance from his mother and his wife's dowry.

Henry Dashwood's love for his second family is also used by Fanny to arouse her husband's jealousy and convince him not to help his sisters economically. View all 6 comments. The story focuses on two sisters, ages 17 and 19, and how their romantic interests and relationships epitomize their different approaches to life.

The older sister Elinor embodies sense, good judgment and discretion. Her sister Marianne is emotional and volatile, following her heart with a supreme disregard for what society might — and does — think. Elinor is pretty much always right. Although at most points in this novel Austen seems to be saying very clearly that Elinor's approach of being sensible is superior to Marianne's sensibility, every once in a while the story suggests that maybe being sensible all the time isn't the best idea, and there needs to be some balance between the two extremes.

Food for thought. One truly nice thing is that despite their vast differences and their occasional fairly frequent annoyances with each other, Elinor and Marianne have a deep love and loyalty for one another. Their relationship remains strong through all of the stresses that hit them, and is even strengthened during the course of the novel.

Another thing that struck me in this story is how many of the characters — other than the totally emotionally honest Marianne — are keeping secrets. Edward and Lucy view spoiler [ have their secret engagement hide spoiler ]. The difference is, some people are keeping secrets to protect other people, for honorable reasons; others are doing it for self-serving reasons. There were several smaller surprises, as you might expect from reading any book after seeing a movie of it.

It was interesting seeing what the filmmakers chose to omit or change e. Can't argue with any of those moves. You have to love a novel that includes a statement like this: The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.

Jane Austen's wit and dry humor really make the story. That clearly needs to change. View all 50 comments. Sense and Sensibility is dense with inactivity. View all 15 comments. CJ I think I'm gonna have to agree with you. Not one of my favorite classics I've ever read I think I'm gonna have to agree with you. Not one of my favorite classics I've ever read Shelves: favorites , published , fiction , classics , traditionally-published , she-says. Edward is kind of useless, I think Marianne got the real prize here.

Also fascinating just how much Austen is saying in this novel. She's saying A LOT and more and more becomes clear to me on every re-read. The scene where Willoughby shows up to confess to Elinor when Marianne is ill was particularly striking to me this time.

What does this say about 'bad people' and the nature of their 'bad acts? It's also really fascinating what Austen is saying about Marianne in this book. How illness and heartbreak change her and reshape her into a stronger, less selfish person. In fact, it is esteemed a bit. And is Marianne really selfish?

That could be debated six ways to Sunday. The book is very complex. There is a lot to think about. I like it even more than I do Pride and Prejudice. Everyone goes crazy over Lizzie Bennett and idolizes her, but my role model will always be Elinor Dashwood. She is a great sister, a trustworthy confidante, someone who always acts with honor and compassion. She is smart, fiscally responsible, stoic, and strong.

I admire her so much and wish I could be more like her in real life. I hate John Dashwood and want to punch him in the throat. It surprises me each time that he is the most hated character for me in the novel. Everyone hates on Marianne, but I like her. So she's a silly teenager! That's okay. She certainly learns and grows more than anyone else in the whole novel.

She has a good heart and loves her sister dearly - I adore the scenes where she stands up for Elinor! The loving sister relationship is one of the best things about this novel. Nothing melts my heart more than good sibling relationships. Even though their personalities couldn't be more different, their love and compassion for each other knows no bounds.

Austen is genuinely funny. I was snickering at some of her writing. She's an amazing author. She gets some jabs in there. Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition. The most hilarious line in the novel: "It is not everyone," said Elinor, "who has your passion for dead leaves.

He was the only male who had me drawing little hearts in my notebook. I can't be bothered with Edward. I don't think he acted very honorably. Elinor could sit no longer. She almost ran from the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease. OMG My heart is breaking so much. Elinor was to be the comforter of others in her own distresses, no less than in theirs She never burdens others with her problems, but is always there to comfort and listen to anyone else.

The way she deals with Lucy Steele! She's a saint to put up with that, OMG! She's beyond amazing. Tl;dr - An amazing book, one I'm sure to read over and over again. This never ceases to be enjoyable! I have watched them innumerable times! I've included a list at the bottom of this review in case anyone wants to see some awesome film adaptations on this amazing novel.

View all 87 comments. Book From Books Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen Jane Austen was an British novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Sense and Sensibility is a novel by Jane Austen, published in It was published anonymously; By A Lady appears on the title page where the author's name might have been. The novel follows the three Dashwood sisters as they move with their widowed mother fr Book From Books Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen Jane Austen was an British novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century.

The novel follows the three Dashwood sisters as they move with their widowed mother from the estate on which they grew up, Norland Park, to their new home, Barton Cottage. The four women must move to a meagre cottage on the property of a distant relative, where they experience love, romance, and heartbreak.

The novel is likely set in southwest England, London and Sussex between and View 2 comments. Sep 14, s. Shelves: classics , love , austen. Want for nothing but patience -- or give it a more fascinating name: Call it hope. As we are all individuals, with our own needs, is it sensible to always act according to our countenance to steal a lovely phrase from Austen , to keep true to ourselves, or is there a code of manners that we should adhere to in order to maintain a proper course of action?

Told through the juxtaposition of two sisters forging their own sensible rationalities as they find themselves in a society fueled by social standings and money, they discover that love does not always fit pleasantly into such a world. An impressive feature of the Jane Austen novels is her ability to construct a broad scale society to immerse her heroines. She juggles a large cast of characters, each with a uniquely rounded personality and varied level of likeability, which gives a realistic scope and portrayal to the story.

Just like in our own lives, we see Elinor and Marianne dealing with friends, rivals, busybodies and outright scoundrels. Austen manages to flesh her characters out with positive and negative traits, giving even the despicable ones a moment to plead their case.

She is clever at keeping an ironic flair to her characters, offering a dark side to ones you initially thought amiable, and bestowing grief of less-than-Prince-Charming characteristics to those who should be the true champion of hearts. The two sisters experience near-mirrored heartbreak and respond in polarizing manners. Even the smallest characters can be looked at in this ways. Perhaps a proper title could have also been Cents and Sensibility , as Austen takes careful aim at the dominating social constructs.

The social commentary is thick and delicious. We witness many broken hearts in the name of money, and many hearts set on love faced with crippling financial consequences. The final results of the novel however, goes to prove the lyrics 'you can't always get what you want, but when you try sometimes, you'll find you get what you need. Especially reading them alongside so many post-modernist works of genius; Austen has been the anchor keeping me from being lost in the Zone.

Occasionally it is nice to escape the bells and whistles of modern lit, to step out of the multi-layered metafiction and swirling narratives that I so love, and read a novel that is just as incredible on a powerful but elegant voice, ironic wit, and an acute sense of society alone.

I highly recommend Jane Austen to anyone. I want to show up with flowers for Elinor and spend all day sipping tea with her from dainty cups and sighing about weather and society. View all 34 comments. The story of two teenage girls with romantic troubles, caused by unreliable men they have dark secrets, but who doesn't?

When their father is no longer living, all the family including the mother, Mrs. Dashwood and third sister Margaret 13 must vacate their mansion in Sussex, Norland Park a large estate which many generations of the quiet respectable Dashwoods have resided.

O The story of two teenage girls with romantic troubles, caused by unreliable men they have dark secrets, but who doesn't? Only men can inherit this property says the law then, a rich uncle, they received it originally from, insisted in his will this provision and relatives can be greedy. John Dashwood their half - brother has little family feelings and his cold-heart wife Fanny none, take over.

Breaking his promise to his dying father to help his sisters and stepmother financially, selfish Fanny persuades him with not too much effort, that these women can survive very well without any assistance, she tells her wealthy husband And money is money and promises just words otherwise, the couple's child, " poor little Harry", would starve!

Sir John Middleton a kindly cousin of the mother's offers the Dashwood's a small cottage low rent to live, close to his big house. Desperately wanting to leave the hostile environment of their former home they relocate there in far away Devonshire, by Allenham village.

Being very pretty women the sisters soon attract admirers, the shy Mr. Edward Ferrars the eldest brother of Fanny who likes Elinor, unlike his sister, Miss Dashwood thinks, but she can never be sure he doesn't speak much. On a rainy day the two girls imprudently are walking outside, over the country hills they enjoy exploring the beautiful area, but the weather becomes too much, running for shelter Marianne takes a tumble hurts her leg and unable to go any further and still some distance from Barton Cottage.

What to do? Elinor can't get her home, Mr. John Willoughby hunting with his dog in the rain, comes along and carries Marianne back to the cottage. The amazed mother Margaret and the whole family are speechless. Handsome, charming well spoken Mr. Willoughby visits the injured girl every day to see that everything's all right But he doesn't fool anybody He's a good fun loving friend of Sir John's, well known and liked in the neighborhood with a rich old relative he wisely sees often nearby, Mrs.

The perfect man has a rival Colonel Brandon more than ten years older at 35, with a huge house, a lonely honorable gentleman but Marianne has eyes only for Mr. Willoughby a secret libertine. And Mr. Ferrars has a fiancee, he never mentions Even the Colonel, might have skeletons in his closet A great book by the incomparable Jane Austen, her likes will never arise again years go by relentlessly, customs and technology changes the Earth either for better or worse, but there will always be her words.

Eventually though, love prevails, they are reunited and live happily ever after; the end. The tone is, for the most part, lighthearted. This romcom blueprint is as old as the hills but, in a way, never gets old. And closer to our time, Harlequin novels, French art-house films, and innumerable popular Hollywood comedies and Bollywood musicals. One could bet that such an overabundant genre would keep banging on about the same old things ad nauseam.

In a way, it does. Jane Austen takes place in the middle of this long literary and artistic tradition. Sense and Sensibility , her first published novel , displays a significant command of modern writing techniques: free indirect speech, subtext, scenes, summaries, plot twists, red herrings, MacGuffins and cliffhangers.

No wonder she is still widely read and considered one of the most entertaining writers in the English language. Austen builds her novels with plot devices that crime novels authors, a century later, will use to even greater dramatic effect. Sense and Sensibility is lighthearted and sparkly to all appearances, but there is also a darker side to this novel.

It depicts the late century English gentry, a social environment where romantic love is chiefly governed by financial considerations and parental interference. Marriages are, for the most part, arranged , and the conflicts that make the crispy bits of the story often come from a misalignment between the inclinations of the heart and the tyranny of household finances. Hence the constant obsession with income, inheritance, estate, property, dowry, annuity, economic power and so forth.

Instead of Sense and Sensibility , the title of this novel could have been Love and Money. It is also and more essentially about the duplicity and treacherous pitfalls of social interactions. All this reveals layer upon layer of cognitive dissonance below the seemingly well mannered verbal conversations. Underneath a masquerade of proper conduct and decorum, the whole social game gradually develops as a corrupt nest of vipers, booby-trapped with subterfuge, economic rapacity, concealed mindfucks, gossip-mongering old nags Mrs Jennings , moneygrubbing fishwives Mrs Ferrars, old and young , and devious, selfish young beaux Willoughby and Edward.

Austen makes it amply clear that a character such as Marianne, always blunt and uncompromising, is maladjusted to this social milieu. In the course of the novel, we see her, at first, as a zesty, vibrant, high-spirited girl. She soon becomes an infatuated young woman, prone to outpours of suffocation and hyperventilation. She then falls into a severe state of depression and illness.

And at the close of the novel, she is a weakened, dispirited housewife, married to an insipid older man she has never loved — yet, she is inexplicably happy! Meanwhile, Elinor, the level-headed, restrained, stilted and sightly boring sister, ends up with a happy read: compromise marriage of her own.

In short: sense and sensibility, same difference. Still, her acerbic satire is the first drop of acid that will eventually erode the oppressive lid of the age-old capitalistic patriarchy. NB: A massive thank you to my brilliant reading buddy, Michelle: check out her review right here. View all 23 comments. I love these books so much 4. I love these books so much This is the third Jane Austen book I've read and it's by far my favorite.

I love the story, love the heroines, love the MEN I just love everything about this. View all 3 comments. For me, it took too long to get going. Not until they arrived in London that I started to get curious about how the story will unfold and what will happen to the Dashwood sisters. Elinor, I liked well enough but I found Marianne to be too self-righteous and annoying.

She did turn a new leaf in the end but I think it came too late for me to start liking her at that point. Owning to the fact that bec [reread] And even after I thought I was in the clear, had to suffer through his long arse, asinine speech of how he pitied himself view spoiler [for having to give Marianne up in order to marry his very wealthy wife Insufferable man!

Get lost already! I'm afraid I was not partial to any of the men in this. Can you tell? The only one with Y chromosome who was a bit interesting was Colonel Brandon but he had such a small role in the book. I wish we could see more of him! Even Mr. Palmer was entertaining to read about. As for the rest, I hated Willoughby yes, needed to be point out again and Edward was All these main characters in this book made me appreciate, probably for the first time, the 'mouthy' characters in Austen novels.

I know, I know, I'm shocked myself. I never endeared myself to any of them before. Although I was real close to do that for Miss Bates in Emma but ended up didn't - she was okay but that was all. Here, I loved it whenever Mrs. Palmer were in the scene. Delightful in contrast of several insipid, stoic characters. View all 28 comments. This is a great story and very interesting, but neither of the heroines is a favorite of mine.

And I'm not really crazy about the boys, either. I'm not saying Austen wrote them incorrectly, but these were different times, and not all the stuff they did translates all that well into most people's version of what a modern-day heroine or hero should look like. If you're a new-to-Austen reader, just keep that in mind. The general gist of this one is that two sisters, who have recently fallen on ha This is a great story and very interesting, but neither of the heroines is a favorite of mine.

The general gist of this one is that two sisters, who have recently fallen on hard financial times, also fall in love with two men. With vastly different ways of showing it, and vastly different outcomes to their respective romances.

Marianne is impetuous, full of life, sure of herself, and unwilling to tone it down , as my mother would say. Her ideas of love are pure romance, and anyone who looks at love differently has no soul. She very much represents how love is perceived by someone who is young or doesn't really have any experience with the many different ways real love makes an appearance. Elinor is very much the woman who knows how to put her lipstick on and hide her crazy, as my mother would also say.

In other words, she's got the Sense and Sensibility not to share her hopes and dreams, inner turmoil, or just her business in general with everyone. Because let's face it, Marrianne is ridiculous. Not her spirit, but her ideas of this perfect man and perfect love that will forever stamp your soul are just bonkers. I think we all men and women start out with a little bit of Marrianne in ourselves.

You only know what you know. This means that young people aren't particularly stupid, they just haven't had enough LIFE slap them upside their heads yet. But they will. Ooooooh, they will. At the same time, I don't think Elinor is a paragon of womanhood just because she managed to stuff each and every emotion deeeeeep into some secret hidey-hole in her psyche.

I can't help but think it would have been better for her to confide in someone Don't judge. We all have our ways of coping. Ok, ok. So, even if this wasn't my complete cuppa, it's still a fantastic story and a must for anyone who is Austen-curious. As always, she wrote characters who were for the times true to life, fully formed, and definitely worth reading about. View all 63 comments.

After this second read, I'm compelled to amend my first review, for my perspective of the book is quite altered. This debut publication of Jane Austen is, in my view, a complete book in itself, an excellent introduction of Jane Austen to the world of classical literature. On this second read, the first surprise I was in for is the dramatic quality of the book on the whole. I've certainly missed that. The actions, the suspense, the wealth of emotions it arouses are beyond comparison.

It is powerf After this second read, I'm compelled to amend my first review, for my perspective of the book is quite altered. It is powerful and strong, and also theatrical. The reading experience was very satisfying and rewarding, for it was not mere reading, it was also seeing the story come alive before you.

I didn't read, I lived it. The story is, of course, focused on the lives, loves, desires, longings, and characters of the Dashwood sisters. Elinor is the kind, devoted and reasonable sort with rare strength and fortitude. Marianne, on the other hand, although kind and devoted, is impulsive, emotional, and opinionated. The popular and accepted character interpretation of Elinor and Marianne is that the former represents sense and the latter sensibility.

However, I doubt whether such a strict distinction is possible. It wouldn't be fair to say that Elinor is not sensible nor Marianne has no sense. I believe the distinction lies in the degree. The main focus of the story is on Elinor and Marianne's love stories. Elinor's and Edward's love and attachment to each other were very subtle in their presentation, unlike Marianne's and Willoughby's which was very expressive.

This is why I felt Elinor's and Edward's love was forced, not felt but only stated. I'm glad my misunderstanding was rectified with this reading. Sense and Sensibility however is more than a love story. It addresses many other deeper issues such as vanity, self-realization, class difference, and human nature.

Jane Austen is well known for her social criticism and commentary of the regency period and her brilliancy in human observation. Jane Austen's hero in Sense and Sensibility is an unusual choice compared with her later choices of heroes. Colonel Brandon is not a young man but a man in his prime. This choice was somewhat a puzzle to me earlier, but now I comprehend that it was essential to the story.

A man with good sense, kind-hearted, strong, and benevolent, a man who has an unhappy past, a man who himself has suffered so that he could empathize with another had to be chosen to be the hero. I highly commend Austen for her excellent choice and for giving us a lifelong loving character.

The rest of the characters who set the story in motion have the usual Austen flavour. The oppressed and misunderstood Edward, naive mother Dashwood, the silly but kind Mrs. Ferrars are variation enough to keep the readers interested, engaged and absorbed. I love her amazing ability to draw you into the setting of the story and to make you part of it. Her characters are so real that the good ones become your friends while the wicked ones become your enemies! This element of realism is one of the strongest reasons for the popularity of her work over the years.

Sense and Sensibility is undoubtedly a brilliant piece of work by Jane Austen, and the reading experience was highly gratifying. View all 8 comments. Hmmm, how to critique one of the most revered writers of romance literature? Now, before all of your Jane-ites get on my case for being unromantic or whatever, let me say only that unfortuantely, I read "Persuasion," Austen's last novel, and found it to be one of the best books I've ever read.

Now having read "Sense and Sensibility," I will say that it truly doese feel like a first novel, as if the author was still trying to find her voice. So I've done the bookends of Austen, much like a concer Hmmm, how to critique one of the most revered writers of romance literature?

So I've done the bookends of Austen, much like a concert of Beethoven's 1st and 9th symphonies Her prose is art, but the story, in my opinion, is lacking. Two semi-rich young women do the social dance with men who are alternately gentlemanly or cads, reversals and revelations ensue, followed at the end by weddings which are not exactly meant to leave us with the warmest of feelings as many weddings do.

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